How To Get A Higher Disability Rating

240

VA Disability Rating

Whether fighting for a higher disability rating or filing your disability claim with Dept. of Veterans Affairs, this article has insider tips that win.

How To Manage Your VA Claim For Disability Compensation

Filing disability claims with the Dept of Veterans Affairs is tricky.

Getting documentation together for one disability claim can be a full-time job. Try filing two, three or four disability claims at the same time. It can be a mess to get your VA compensation and take years to sort out.

I’ll start by explaining what I did and why it was wrong. Yes, I have screwed up my own disability claims a time or two. This is yet another case of ‘do what I say, not what I did.’ It is important to not repeat the following because it will cause a lengthy appeal process – and there is nothing worse than a 10-year appeals process.

It’s like waiting for your IRS tax refund, except it’s more money and, like Rip Van Winkle, I look a whole lot older. VA compensation is a good thing, but it’s too bad disability compensation is such a racket.

Don’t be dumb. I hand wrote my initial application for disability compensation without reviewing my Service Medical Records (SMR). My claim led with the statement: “see supporting medical documentation in my file.” This was dumb.

Imagine someone sending you a hand written, 300-page manuscript (doctor’s scribbles plus my own) and allowed you 4 hours to read it. Then they ask you a ton of questions that are legally binding. That is what I asked the VA to do 10 years ago when processing my disability claim.

In reality, the VA disability claims process is very complex and time consuming for the veteran and the Dept of Veterans Affairs. Do not expect the VA to connect the dots. This is your job if you choose to take it, or you’ll be older and fatter still fighting the good fight, like me.

Start with your Service Medical Records

Get started. For disabled veterans with copies of their SMRs, you should get moving. Any disability condition diagnosed within one year of separation could be considered service connected, even if it was undiagnosed in service.

For those without their records, request a copy of your SMR’s from your local Veterans Affairs regional office. Mail in a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request. Click here to find a sample FOIA letter. Once you have the chance to review the documents, you can begin your own research.

[kudanileads_on_click_intent optin_id=optin_4]

Click To Download Free FOIA eBook For Your Claim

[/kudanileads_on_click_intent]

Research every disability or condition you have within your medical records (about the possible presumptive conditions that show up within one year – bring these up too). To do this, identify the key terms and find them in 38 CFR Part 4: Schedule of Ratings.

For example, let’s say you have Sinusitis. Within your records, you can document 5 different occasions that you went to the doctor for the condition (like allergies, congestion, etc). Go to the CFR and find Sinusitis.

A quick way to do this is to click [Control + F] and type in Sinusitis. This should lead you right to the rating criteria. Notice for the condition, the requirements “either or” tendency. Here, you either have periods of incapacitation or you have “non-incapacitating” episodes. Decide where you currently fall into the rating schedule. Then, you can Google the condition on either regular Google or Google Scholar. Read about what Sinusitis actually is and what causes it. Get educated on each and every condition you are claiming this same way.

Write up a summary of all the conditions and include dates of treatment while in service and after. You do not need to seek medical attention for every issue in order to document it. For example, incapacitating episodes are considered episodes that required a doctor’s visit. Non-incapacitating episodes are not. A person can self-medicate certain conditions. But always remember, the condition needs to be currently impacting you in order to count. If it stopped hurting two years ago, then you will likely not get a rating for it.

Now Enters VA Documentation

Before the meeting or doctor’s appointment, be sure to have all your ducks in a row. I generally bring all documentation relevant to the specific injury or injuries with me along with a summary sheet. Avoid dropping your whole file on the person’s lap with the expectation that they will sort through it for you. Try to keep the summary sheet as short as possible – One to five pages, depending on the number of issues.

Your documentation will be in addition to this (doctors’ opinions – civilian, VA, military). Always try to keep things as short as possible. Include a table of contents of your injuries. Here is a copy of an actual claim letter for the following claims: 1) sinusitis disability, allergic rhinitis disability and sleep apnea disability. It’s mine, so be gentle.

Disability Claim Evidence

On evidence. One thing your evidence should have is a Nexus letter (hopefully from a doctor) explaining how the evidence in your file is relevant to the condition you have now. This can be tricky for new conditions secondary to service-connected conditions. Never bring your originals anywhere. Take copies of your files with you in a folder to your VSO meeting.

One misunderstanding of many is that lay evidence counts very little because it is not “objective.” (lay evidence is a statement from the veteran or buddy letter that supports a claim). Not true according to Jandreau v. Nicholson, 492 F. 3d 1372 (Fed. Cir. 2007). That court held:

“In a veteran’s claim for benefits, lay evidence can be competent and sufficient to establish a diagnosis of a condition when (1) a layperson is competent to identify the medical condition, [such as a broken leg, but not a form cancer], (2) the layperson is reporting a contemporaneous medical diagnosis, or (3) lay testimony describing symptoms at the time supports a later diagnosis by a medical professional.”

This means the lay person cannot “render medical opinions, including etiology opionions,” but can provide testimony that is an eyewitness account of medical symptoms. Barr v. Nicholson, 21 Vet.App. 303, 307 (2007).

According to Jandreau, “Contrary to the Veterans’ Court, the relevance of lay evidence is not limited to the third situation, but extends to the first two as well.” To that point, the VA had been guilty of largely disregarding personal statements because they were not “objective.” They were wrong and the Federal Circuit had the last say, binding future VA decisions.

On that note, I would question anyone claiming VA Compensation adjudicators are “objective,” too, given that the government takes an unjustified position in 70 percent of veterans denials. This means VA adjudicators are not following the law.

How to Select your Veteran Service Officer

About the meeting. Be careful to never overwhelm your audience. The summary will keep your conversation focused. Also remember to be as friendly as possible. Many VSO’s make less that $35,000 per year and should be respected for their sacrifices to help us get the benefits we were promised.

VSO Selection. Not all VSO’s are created equal. Keep an open mind and shop around for the one you feel the most confident with handling your case. Some have less training or experience than others. Others have too many cases to directly manage effectively. The advantage for you will be the fact that you have your case already together. Talk to the VSO about how to further document your claim prior to filing it. If the VSO feels confident that you’re ready to go, go for it. One thing to consider, a bad VSO can squash your ability to appeal successfully by failing to notice shortfalls in your documentation before an appeal.

The application step does not require a VSO. You can fill out the VA claim online: VONAPP. The non-computer savvy veteran can download the Form 21-526 and fill it out manually or request that the VA mail one to you by calling 800-827-1000. This begins the process.

If doing this on your own, remember that there are many ways to skin a cat. You can be very general about the condition(s) or very specific. I have had success with both. Do not attempt to diagnose the condition yourself. For the sinus condition, you could merely state “sinus condition” or “problem breathing”. Or, you can be specific and state “sinusitis” if it is in your file. However, do not get cute and diagnose something that is not stated in your SMRs. List the symptoms, not the diagnosis (back pain with numbness down the legs, for example). Now, if you believe you have something like sciatica, then listing that after the symptoms may be fine. Again, this depends on your specific situation and comfort level.

For example, click here on the blue text to see what the Department of Veterans Affairs provides about this process. It’s a little vague and explains why so many websites are espousing advice. An informed decision is always the best decision.

Disability Claims and Breathing Problems

Here’s a continuance of my own little story for service connection for the following: Sleep Apnea secondary to Sinusitis and Allergic Rhinitis. I was denied for these conditions right after my separation from service, in 2001.

A little background. I had a sleep study in service conducted by the Fargo VA. The VA had the records of a sleep study and was notified as such. Yet, during my evaluation, the VA did not request its own files and subsequently denied my condition. I had brief apneas but did not require a machine = 30 percent. They also denied service connection for the other conditions despite at least 12 instances within my service records requiring treatment. The sinusitis was later confirmed in 2009 via an MRI as were the polyps from allergic rhinitis. The next year I was given a CPAP machine.

Rubber, meet Road. In 2010, I put the whole claim together with a little documentation help from law school and “The Little Book on Legal Writing.” To see what I mean, here are the first couple pages of my disability claim. I called the Fargo VA for the actual sleep study from 1998. While on the phone, the FOIA guy at the VA faxed the records to me (that was the morning of my recent VA examination – don’t wait to the last second like I did). The records verified my apneas. I was also able to find Congressional Reports about the conditions of the dormitories we lived in while at tech school – there were issues of asbestos and leaking sewage along with outdated HVAC systems blowing particles around. I immediately came down with sinusitis and pneumonia after arrival. I included this documentation in case I come down with certain cancers down the road.

Armed with the report, my medical records and a typed summary, I went to the exam. The first appointment was with an Ear Nose and Throat doctor. He said the VA already conceded service connection but he needed to find out how many episodes I have every year. I handed him my documentation. While he did not read over the documentation in full, he most likely referred to it after the meeting while filling out his exam notes. This is key, especially if the examiner did not take good notes while in the meeting or forgot some key point that you mention. The summary you hand him may be the difference between a 10 or 30 percent.

My second evaluation was for sleep apnea. I showed the doctor my current diagnosis along with the former diagnosis while I was in service. She took the time to read over my summary, which explained how the VA missed my earlier diagnosis. Since I had the old sleep study exam with me, she was able to clearly tell that I had sleep apnea while in service. Because of the way my documentation was set out, she told me on the spot that she was going to tell the VA I had sleep apnea in 1998. This could result in a decision for retroactive pay if I can prove VA committed a Clear and Unmistakable Error during their 2001 denial.

Release of Information: VA Claims Investigation

For you. After you file your claim, VA will send a letter verifying receipt of your claim and notifying you of the information they need. This will include release forms they will need you to fill out in order to request files from civilian doctors you have seen. Be sure to read everything very carefully. Sometimes the dates can be wrong or VA might be asking for the wrong information. In addition, you may have better luck getting documents from doctors than will the VA. When you forward medical release letters to civilian medical providers for their records, be sure to follow up with a phone call to ensure they understand what you are requesting, especially for psychologists. Leave nothing to chance and never expect the VA will figure out how to contact these people for you.

At the examination for conditions like PTSD, VA has disability examination criteria online. Google whatever condition to read about the experience of other veterans after their exams. This can help a lot. First, it will help you frame your condition in terms that the VA examiner will use in their analysis of your condition.

In addition, write a one or two page summary about your condition. Click here to view my own sample disability claim. Use bullet points with brief explanations of each and every treatment for that particular condition. Be careful to not overwhelm your examiner. Ask if the examiner has viewed your C-File before the exam. If not, you may have a claim for a review if the examiner gives you an adverse finding. If the C-File is not present for the exam, be sure to note the fact. A lack of C-File can bias your exam and be cause for a new one if you do not get the results you think you deserve.

Lastly, be patient. The whole process can take up to one year or longer.

VA Denials and Lowball Ratings

Here’s a recap of where we’re at with this process. I’ve written about the disability claim process up through the VA appointment with an evaluator and supplying evidence to the VA about your claim. Now, we will go through what to do when you get your adjudicated claim back with an approval or denial. You will generally have one of three outcomes: 1) full grant of your claim; 2) a partial grant: for example, they gave you TBI but at 10 percent instead of 40 percent; 3) full denial – do not pass go, do not collect $200. With the paperwork the VA sends you, you’ll never know which of the three you are unless you received 100 percent rating.

Be in the know. Request a copy of your file from the VA first. This is the only way to know everything the VA examiners found and how the VA then adjudicated your claim based on that information. Click here for a copy of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) letter you can send for a copy of your file.

In my own case, I had filed a claim for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). I had a head injury while in service and received a Psychoeducational Evaluation in college. The evaluator believed my head injury caused some degree of memory loss. When the VA performed their own evaluation, the Neurologist gave me a hard time because I like to drink beer, wine and whiskey in typical Portland-style quantities. A psych evaluator reaffirmed the memory loss during another test. An MRI found brain scarring. Good to go, right?

Wrong. I received a letter back from the VA confirming my condition, kind of. The TBI was rated at 10 percent because the memory loss was related to the fact that I enjoy my drink, according to the neurologist. Note: the neurologist did not have a copy of my C-File for the exam. The brain scarring was claimed to be likely from Multiple Sclerosis and not a head injury. I do not have MS. “What the F?!” I thought. That’s the difference between a 10 percent and 40 percent rating, or $523 per month (Vet + Child). That little bob and weave allowed the VA to keep $6,200 of my money every year, if I gave up.

Anyone can Win Against the VA

Beat the machine. I requested a copy of my file to read through the full analysis. Coincidently, I had an appointment with the Speech Pathology person at the Portland VA. He reviewed my MRI and the evaluation from the neurologist. “That’s BS…” he told me. There is no way drinking can cause the memory loss that I have unless I was drunk and still drinking at the evaluation. I wasn’t. In addition, the MRI brain scarring claimed as Multiple Sclerosis was completely off base. One little VA trick was that the radiologist probably did not have a copy of my claim (C-file) but was just given the MRI and some notes to review.

I then received new evaluations from the VA on the Healthcare side that rebutted the claims from the Benefits side. I did not drink for one month before the evaluation, to rule out the booze effect. The MRI was reviewed and rebutted by another radiologist in light of my actual C-File. The radiologist stated my head injury was the likely cause of the scarring, not MS. My note to readers: the Health side of the VA can be very helpful in fighting against the dark side of the VA. It’s very “Star Wars” over there.

Abracadabra. Once all the information was assembled, I walked over to my friendly Veterans Service Officer (VSO) at the VFW and filed a Notice of Disagreement. I personally elected for DRO review. The VSO told me it was the best appeal he had ever seen from a veteran. The claim went from 10 to 40 percent. And out of the top hat popped $6,200 per year plus a lump sum for retroactive pay. I didn’t give up and I didn’t die in the process. Hooray for me and hooray for my daughter.

To look at how I document my claims, check out my Sinusitis disability claim. You’ve now walked through the process of filing for your disability claim and appeal with me, soup to nuts.

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
howard steward
howard steward

Filed an appeal over two years ago,have not heard anything.Filed claims for heart disease.ptsd.diabetic nuerothopy,have been waiting almost one yearto hear something.i was told the other claims would go a head of my appeal.what is your take.

john d. davis
john d. davis

Finally after ten years of denials and appeals. I!m glad to hear the V.A. is going to acknowledge the fact that I was in a Combat zone. Maybe I should capitalize the C-ombat. The Vietnam Campaign Medal was awarded by the country -Vietnam. These tricky law dogs like to hide behind words,, they told me that since the Communists won Vietnam that it the( V.C.M.) was not considered to be an Honorable citation. How convienient is that.? The good news with that is , the recent pressure from Vietnam Veterans Organizations against Our congress, has made our Honorable Law dogs admit to Hazardous D–Duty!!! The Department of Lawyers is going to start reckognizing The Vietnam Campaign Medal as a CCC-ombat Medal. Also it is going to reckognize the Vietnam Service Medal (issued by our wonderous U.S. Government ) as a legitamate Combat Medal. See,we do have strength in numbers!! I!m open for suggestions,, 24//7. Will volunteer my time for any War Veteran. E-mail [email protected]. Your information will be confidential. John Davis 23d Infantry –Americal Division-Ho Chi Men trail. Republic of Vietnam. Chu Lai.

KEVIN ELLIOTT
KEVIN ELLIOTT

I submitted a request for compensation for PTSD……it was denied because a review of my DD214 reveiled that I never deployed anywhere. The trouble is, whoever reviewed it knows nothing about what they are looking at! I have the KLM..SEA Ribbon, and the Kuwait ribbon. Who can I talk to to get this straight??

Dave Wallace
Dave Wallace

To KEVIN ELLIOTT, my DD214 does not reflect my deployment either. All I had was request for orders, but not the actual orders for my awards. When I requested an evaluation for PTSD, I sent the request of orders that I had. The VA used those, along with my counselling, to give me compensation.

brandon Navy
brandon Navy

I first Fractured my ankle during PT. Then was ordered by the doctor to stay off the ship for 30 days for rehabilitation. But my captain Went against those orders and brought me back to the ship. Then 2 days later I fell down a latter well because I was on crutches and was not supposed to be on a ship. I landed on the fractured ankle And hyper extended my knee And twisted my back extremely bad. Sense then there has been 2 surgeries on my ankle And has not been able to fix it. I have not had time to have surgery on my knee yet. And Im in rehab
for my back. Because of the constant pain I am unable to sleep at night. Im about to get out of the navy what is my first step i need to take i need all the help i can get. do you think i will get any thing for all this?

Freddy R Atwood
Freddy R Atwood

Make sure you have all these complaints and/or conditions notated in your medical records. Get a full complete copy of the medical records, including Copies of the X-Rays.
You can request a “medical discharge” though I can’t remember exactly how to go about it. A medical discharge will give you the opportunity to go before a board which determines and gives you a disability rating for each condition. After your discharge, go straight to the VA or DAV and they’re going to rate you usually higher.
This is how it worked in my case but that was 40 years ago. I don’t think it will be much different now though.
Also get written testimony from anyone and everyone who witnessed your accidents, or knows about your medical conditions and how they affect your life on a daily basis. Mentally, physically, emotionally. Nothing is too trivial.
This is about the best I can do guy. I hope that it helps. Thanks for your service!

Freddy R Atwood
Freddy R Atwood

I believe that I just replied to a complaint or questions from 5 yrs. ago. Sorry.

Marshal
Marshal

After 42 years of military service, I retired in 2008. Served in Viet Nam as well as OEF/OIF. My claim for PTSD was denied because, ” you did not have a plan”. I’m assuming they mean a suicide plan.

katie
katie

It irritates me that there isn’t an equivalent for PTSD for folk in MI who had to sit there and read dozens of reports every night of atrocities that happened by the enemy. Some people were seriously affected.

Paul Woolford
Paul Woolford

Ben, I really need help and have 70% brain damage (possible service connected) and another 10% rating on my right arm/elbow since 1965. I’ve had a lot of trouble with my arm and VA has suppressed all medical evidence they have on record for 6 years now albeit F.O.I.A. have been sent them every year. This is in short.

Thanking you in advance,

Paul Woolford
Philippines

Chris
Chris

Hello All,

Please read my post and shine some light on a few questions.

1998
I am service connected for chronic pain syndrome as the result of a varicose vein stripping at 20%. Additionally, service connected at zero percent of varicose veins that took place where the above mention veins were stripped.

Also, as a result of the operation I received service connected zero percent right-side prominence penile veins, which hurt at times.

Today 2011

I can not take the pain any longer (or the pain meds, just nasty), I should have roughed up the VA years ago, but used my primary care doctor, who was useless.

This past Friday at the VA, I receive a scan of my leg and was told that the Navy Doctor who did the stripping did it wrong. From what I gathered the Navy Doctor did not address the cross veins, he left dead ends, which balloon with blood causing major pain and swelling.

Additionally, I was told I have a serious vein problem and require an addtional operation. The Nurse performing the scan said to an intern “wow, no wonder why he’s in pain”. I follow-up with the VA in one week, to discuss an operation. I will get a copy of the information from this exam for my files.

Questions

Should I file for an increase before the operation?
I do not want the VA to do the new operation, the procedure they use is outdated and requires more recovery, is this a problem?
I am very upset that it was done wrong over ten years ago, is their anything I can do legally other than an increase?

Thanks, Gents.

Stay Well, and Bless our young Brothers out their!

Carl Lanzilli
Carl Lanzilli

Dear Sir/ Madam, I am awaiting a decision from the rating board. My VA councillor/psychirist who has seen me many times, gave me a GAF score of 43. The VA C&P person who only saw me once at the C&P exam gave me a GAF score of 55. My question is: whose opinion regarding GAF scores does the rating officer customarily give more weight to or do they just average it out? In my case an average would be a GAF of 49. Thank you very much.

glen moore
glen moore

i need advice on my claim just filed for service connected disability. for severe anxiety disorder Imtermittant explosive disorder,and bipolor II. I have a degree but I have been terminated four times because of anxiety and anger issues as well as inpatient rehab 6 times. I need to do this correctly my family depends on it.

Chris
Chris

Update.
Last week, I reported to the VAMC to discuss my vein scan. The intern was helpful as he struggled to explain my conditions to me, but overall he said the issue with my leg is perforator venous insufficiency, which is causing the swelling, discoloration and pain.

I review the paper he had, it said my left leg was examined, I told the intern “no, it wasn’t” (note to self) and asked why that was recorded. Needless, he didn’t know.

Shortly thereafter, the Vein Clinic Chief came in; he said my pain is not from veins, I smirked and said “really”.

He recommended an orthopedic exam, and rambled on about my age (young 36) and physical appearance (so happens I am handsome, lol).

At the end, he did not say anything about my condition, and told me nothing about the scan.

So, what did we learn Veterans:
1.)DO NOT let Doctor’s bully you if you’re a young (or older) Veteran, remain calm and take notes!
2.)Request all records of appointments, after this huge waste of time I walked right downstairs and submitted a FOIA request. *****Make this action concurrent with all your appointments*****
3.)Ask all Doctors like Ben suggests, Have YOU reviewed my scan, have YOU reviewed my file, etc. I forgot to do this because I was mad and being statistic after listening to nonsense.
4.)Don’t give up!!!

Three days after my VAMC exam (waste of time appointment). I had the same scan conducted by a private Doc; the results were not so good, I need more operations.

If you do not have medical insurance, try to use public benefits, Social Security, Unemployment, Medicare, State Veterans Assistance, State Programs, or just go to the ER at your local hospital they have programs too.

Helpful Information: Veterans review this site in-depth; the ANSWERS you seek are here, our fellow Veterans have provided to us, free of charge.

http://www.uscourts.cavc.gov/research_court_cases/DecisionsOpinions.cfm

Above is the link to the Court of Veterans Appeals, search function. Interesting note, I tried to link from the VA’s main site to here, the link is invalid, makes me wonder……

Tips using this site
Enter keywords related to your case.
Search through the cases make sure the case was granted and or approved.
List out the evidence the Veteran used to get a favorable rating.
Seek similar evidence for your case.
Package, prepare and deliver.

Last week Steve Jobs died, and so did several Military personal, this world is a crazy one because the news didn’t report it, the Jobs story was bigger………..It’s up to us to speak up………

Sincerely,
Chris

God Bless my fellow brothers and sisters out there, you are in my hearts and prayers for a safe, healthy return…..

Melissia
Melissia

I may be out of line here but can you please call my husband and help him? When he was in the military while out on stormy seas he fell down a ladder hitting his head and he has suffered every since. He has put in for 100% disability over a year ago. When he put in for this same thing before they denied him. I hoping maybe you can help him more than myself in knowing how to get through to the VA think heads that this occurred and that his migraines, memory loss, also his records show that his T2 levels increased after this fall but they have refused to see that they are service connected before. What do you think his chances are of getting it this time around?

Thank you Melissia

hitthedeckboys
hitthedeckboys

Patience, Patience … It is a case by case scene… each case is different …It takes 2 to 3 appeals to get through before approved . Also evidence… Any doctor reports report immed to the VA office…  Get a VA special trauma doctor to exam your husband if of importance . It has to show service connected. Each case as stands is taking 16 months….Also you may try to check on your husbands stats on comp and pention on Ebenefits.com and or the 1- 800- 827- 1000 numbers. You must establish a password for Ebenefits by the number on the site. And you may update your case and appeals if needed by calling the ombudsman listed on the site. You will be surprised how much of your information is on Ebenefits and never updated fully though. Good luck and I will say a prayer for your husband.

KENNETH GREEN
KENNETH GREEN

I WOULD LIKE SOME INFORMATION ABOUT MY SLEEP APNEA AND HOW DO I GO ABOUT PUTTING IN A CLAIM

JAHATEH
JAHATEH

I HAVE BEEN RECEIVING 10% DISABILITY FOR 22 YEARS WITHOUT AN INCREASE. IN OCT OF 2010 I FINALLY PUT IN FOR AN INCREASE, IT HAS BEN A YEAR NOW AND STILL NO DECISION. CAN SOME ONE TELL ME WHAT MY CHANCES ARE FOR AN INCREASE AND WHAT IS THE USUAL AMOUNT OF TIME IT TAKES TO GET A RULING. ALSO WHAT IS THE 20 YEAR LAW.

hitthedeckboys
hitthedeckboys

You have a awesome chance hun. Bring more evidence of a need for more and you should be okay. As always it can take several times. All cases are behind months because of the over load of men and women returning from OEF, OIF, ECT…It will happen just  s l o w e r.

LITCHPAC
LITCHPAC

Most of you are trying to mooch the system. I got 10% for hypertension and didn’t even ask for that. Otherwise I would get 0% from the VA and that would be fine with me. I was raised to work for what you get and not to ask for handouts. I worked VERY hard during my 22 year military career….going from PFC to MAJ.
Regarding the sleep apnea the military had NOTHING to cause this whatsoever. Either you have it/or you don’t….the military job/duties/sickness/etc has absolutely nothing to do with sleep apnea. Why a person gets disability for that is beyond my comprehension and in my opinion is fraud/waste and abuse as are many of the other things that veterans are compensated for.
Please let the VA give their money to veterans that deserve it…..soldiers with missing limbs/half their brain gone/severely burned/etc. It was never set up to give compensation for 99% of the things in the VA disibility book.
Work hard every day and you won’t need any handouts.

hitthedeckboys
hitthedeckboys

Each case is different…You do not know each soldiers/ vets  background and situation.          For you to remark all is fraud is ridiculous. High blood pressure ??? Your rate is high blood pressure??? That is a waiste of our money…

Geo Vessell
Geo Vessell

Pompous, self-righteous Mr Litchpac…..I served 1979-1987 and waited 23 years to apply for VA disability benefits….Why did I apply? Because I was hurt while in the Navy and was due compensation…You seem to know it all………

Alex
Alex

I agree. I was injured in Vietnam and am just now going to file a claim.

Revan
Revan

Probably sat in the rear with the gear, I suppose in your eyes with my jacked up back and PTSD I don’t deserve my service dog either? I can’t stand for more than 45 minutes or I collapse can’t bend over can’t sit certain ways or pick up my 6 month son? Yea your right America shouldn’t take care of the ones that took the real burden on our back. Oh yea and if you didn’t want your claim there is an option to turn it down. Better go back and claim your paper cuts………”sir”

George
George

Wow, thanks Doctor for your advice on what is compensable with the V.A. and what is not. Oh wait, you’re not a Doctor? No surprise here.

Susan
Susan

This is to Paul Herrera- and anyone else who does not understand “VA math”. The VA does not add percentages straight- 40 +20 does not equal 60, and here is why: They take the highest single percentage and subtract it from a 100% (a whole person). This leaves a remaining 60% of a whole person. The next highest percentage is taken off of that- so in our example, 20% of the remaining 60% is 12%. This then gets added to the original 40% for 52%, which then gets rounded either up or down to nearest 10%— or 50% combined. Hope this helps.

Mike
Mike

Tell the Maj up there to shove it. The burning oil fields of Iraq and an exploding IED left me with 1 working lung and the chemicals and burning oil has given me at least 2 strokes. Don’t you dare tell me what i deserve.

Draq
Draq

Is there a way I can get a copy of my Disability rating letter fast? Can I go to the VA office near where I live (Wilshire Department in california) To obtain a copy of it the same day?

hitthedeckboys
hitthedeckboys

Hurry and wait hun…You are not giving complete facts but It will be a no sorry.

BuckleyBensinger
BuckleyBensinger

I am Vietnam vet. 67-68..i was in hospital 24 evc.in long Bien..is it possible to get medical records to show VA. to increase my Benifits for an ongoing condition in my throat..Thanks..Vet….

jenny
jenny

i have been assigned a case manager from the v a for my compensation and pension what is she going to do? i havent recieved my ratings but they have all the info needed although i havent me my primary care doctor. i am enrolled at the v a and the doctors do know that my case is service connected. how lnog will it take to get ratings and get financial help im really struggling and almost homeless ihave have tbi a cyst on my brain and epilepsy and still have 3 kids to care for and my husband walked out what can i do to get some freakin help?

hitthedeckboys
hitthedeckboys

If you are a vet hun the VA has a help center for homeless and military women in crisis…Ask your VA center…

LITCHPAC
LITCHPAC

Message to Jenny:

GET A JOB AND THEN YOU WOULD BE ABLE TO TAKE CARE OF YOUR CHILDREN AND HAVE A HOME.

Regardless of what the VA gives you it won’t be enough to support enough income to purchase a home or support 3 children.

WAKE UP AND HAVE A REALITY CHECK

Eagledriver
Eagledriver

LITCHPAC your a Dick.

Joe
Joe

@ LITCHPAC Go troll somewhere else. Everone knows Officers get a bigger rate then enlisted. That is if you are even an officer, I would be willing to bet your not even military, If you are / were military, your probably one of those that happen to keep getting school options everytime a deployment came up.

A BEY
A BEY

Thanks for the Information, I have worked my claim to 70% on my own but I am still suffering from the effects of my service related condition. I agree, that not all VSO’s are equal and may not have some information that you have.

LITCHPAC
LITCHPAC

Joe

Unfortunately I’ve found this site to troll and plan to stay here as long as I desire.

If weren’t an enlisted soldier for 10 years I’d take your comments as an insult.

However since I bettered myself by going to OCS and being ALL I CAN BE I can appreciate both worlds. And YES officers do make more money….why – more education, more responsibility, more butt chewing from the boss, more time at work, etc…..so yes there is a reason officers make more money.

Since I have ruffled your feathers all I can say is – IF THE SHOE FITS WEAR IT – and I feel it is my duty to prevent fraud/waste and abuse.

Emma
Emma

You are a real jerk. Get a life and put your “education” to use helping not hurting and antagonizing people who have a whole system against them. I am an Air Force vet with 21 years. I am blessed that I did not experience what some of these folks experienced. Maybe you should consider yourself lucky as well, and butt out. If you have nothing positive to add.

David Schaffer
David Schaffer

He said it from the beginning that he was just a troll. Had he been properly educated he would realize that a troll is somebody that brings nothing to the table and is only around to cause problems. This self proclaimed mustang is why a lot of enlisted have a problem with officers, I honestly feel bad for the men and women under his command.

The bottom line, some of us earned the disability we received upon exiting the service. We put our bodies on the line for this country and as a result have live long issues. We were injured on the job, it is not as if we joined to get disability but, we did earn it.

wpDiscuz