Minneapolis VA Creates New Standing Wheelchair Prototype

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Standing Wheelchair
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Benjamin KrauseParalyzed Veterans of America funded the development of a new standing wheelchair prototype at Minneapolis VA to help paralyzed veterans be more productive in daily activities.

Rehabilitation engineers at Minneapolis VA created a new version of the standing wheelchair that improves on shortcomings from previous attempts at helping paraplegic veterans improve their reach. The new chair has greater stability by utilizing a four-wheel platform that reliably shifts weight front and back.

According to Dr. Gary Goldish, “We modified it by adding a drive wheel that separated the push rim from the tire.” The adaptation transfers the load between the front and back faster to improved stability and mobility.

With a few clicks, the chair transforms to allow increased reach and to reduce changes of developing pressure sores from prolonged sitting.

I can think of many veterans who would benefits from such a development. Let’s hope this model moves into production quick.

Source: https://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2015/01/16/mpls-va-hospital-developes-new-standing-wheelchair/

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12 Comments

  1. Hey! I know that river and where that is located! In fact, I have pictures of where that river begins and ends! ( a signed book and photos, one of the many friends of my moms, I just happened to live way south and awesome when you see huge ships are above you and you are in the “oh oh” zone!)
    Yes, nothing to do with a standing wheel chair, however I bet it wasn’t just the VA involved with this one. Knowing the U of M is quite involved in the new age of progressive technology for the future! It’s cool to see the things they have done, and better yet, cool when your sister in law works there and is pursuing her Masters for one of the first programs of its kind. ( you can research that Ben, because the future is now and will be beneficial to Veterans as well as others.)
    Well, I guess it eases my mind a bit so I can live independently, because of delayed treatment by a doctor who canceled the “right assessment” has now done nothing in a years time but I’ve seen my decline, so has my doctor of 19 years. ( have you ever seen a once BUDDHIST monk who graduated at the top and directed a hospital get mad? They go deathly silent, he remembered all I had been through, his concern?) The ability to walk. It’s no longer a concern, it’s happening, but damn, no one knows where my medical records are? It states it on my discharge physical. I guess because I didn’t complain or make a big deal out of it, and I was dealing with another medical issue, also related to Fibro, which how can they deny what wasn’t a diagnosis yet? As we age it becomes more of a challenge to do the things that are second nature, this would be so awesome to have one. I have one last Ray of hope, and it won’t be ALLISON HICKEY and her “oh we care friend and I realized you were writing about pain,” yeah, as I realized your caller was a pain in the arse and redundant, and I guess is it “thank you” for more harm to my back and psyche? Gee, a case for super Lawyers, my team against the morons in Dallas this should have a red button, “that was easy!” Seriously, the evidence is in words, deeds an action. I can come to peace with my legs not working, but first I prefer to stay in the positive zone. “I haven’t climbed every mountain,” so I DO have miles to go before I sleep! Bless those who get this chair, and bless those who’ve sat in one for so long. Truly, “you can’t always get what you want, but you get what you need!” Me? It feels so very odd, you can’t explain it, hard to describe. But don’t send me to an anesthesiologist who keeps talking about scare tissue, who keeps telling me I do not want another surgery, but as I hit the “ignore button” my partner speaks to me as if I lost my hearing, NOPE! My response, “I do not think you remember, it was a shot like this that I ended up in an ER, but by all means, go for it! I shall say no thanks!”
    Lesson for a young wrong type of Doctor, “NEVER TELL A PATIENT PAST THE AGE OF CONSENT WHAT THEY DO OR DONT WANT.” ( oh, and another ct-scan as the “screw ups can’t write with contrast?) people in the medical profession or are para professionals, we know too much, we have to in order to perform our jobs. Ask my doctor about me, I never fail in telling it like it is, but he knows the real me, a woman who has worked in so many parts of the industry as my body was “preparing me perhaps?”
    I can only say Congradulations Minnesota! ( but I bet it wasn’t all VA!) may this and numerous advances ( no pills please, like a gallon bag full) begin the healing, the hurt no one sees begin, “it shall be an awesome future indeed!” ( I know much more, but zipper is closed on other topics!)

  2. They should tweek it up so the veteran can be eye level with the hoop rim, or at least 10-11 ft. tall. The vet should then join the NBA and make millions dunking the ball in each game.

  3. Since there are other manufacturers that have demonstrated their devices quite similar to this, there is no reason the United States can not fund these and mass produce them. Those who live with spinal cord injuries today should be afforded anything America can do for them to allow them more freedom. We have the people who need work, the buildings to use in manufacture, and the necessary designs. Unfortunately people will still become disabled in the future yet that future can and should be improved for all of them.

  4. having m.s. myself,i can only imagine standing up to do dishes,cook a meal on the stovetop and a lot more.if I could afford one,for sure I would get one.

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